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Author Rating: 0 Topic: Obama's Call to Action: What Will You Do? (Read 596 times)
jwilkes

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« Reply #0: Jan 21, 2009, 3:03 AM »
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President Obama called on Americans to take action. How will you help bring about change?

If you really listened to yesterday’s inaugural address, then you know that President Obama's speech wasn’t just lip service. Sure, it would have been easy to take the podium and proclaim just how wonderful America really is. No one would have disagreed. If he’d said that his journey was historic and ground breaking, again no one would have disagreed.

But the President didn’t just paint a rosy picture of America through the ages, or glorify himself and his accomplishments. He spoke about the challenges we’ll face together over the next four years. But more importantly, he issued a call to action. “Everywhere we look,” he said, “there is work to be done.”

Bringing about change takes courage and initiative, not just from the President and the men and women with whom he surrounds himself, but from each and every one of us. What will you do to contribute to a better tomorrow for our country?

Here is a list of a few things each and every one of us can do to share the responsibility of forging a stronger America:

Volunteer - Whether you spend an afternoon at a soup kitchen, picking up trash on a local beach, fixing up a dilapidated playground, or maybe just visiting people at a convalescent hospital, do something to make your community better. Federal grant money takes time to make its way from Washington into the bank accounts of organizations that are designed to help people. In the meantime, if we all pitch in to help out, you’ll be surprised how fast things can improve without help from the government.

Go Green - There are a million ways to conserve energy and prevent pollution: carpool, turn off unused lights, reuse items rather than discarding them. This nation will spend trillions of dollars over the next eight years in the pursuit of methods and technologies that make our planet cleaner and safer. Let’s all do our part as well.

Donate - Some people can write huge checks to their favorite charitable organizations. Others of us aren’t so lucky, but that doesn’t mean we can’t donate to worthy causes. Clean out your closets and cupboards and send unwanted clothing, toys, and miscellaneous household items to organizations that put them in the hands of individuals and families who are struggling to make it with what they’ve got. Or, spend an extra $5 at the grocery story to pick up a few extra low-cost items at the grocery store, and bring it to a local church or community center that will distribute it to the needy. And if you can spare it, even a small donation of a three or four dollars can make a huge difference to charitable organizations that are struggling in these economic times to provide services to those who really need it.

Take an active part in your child’s education - No matter what your economic station, education is the key to tomorrow’s economy. Sit down with your child every night to help them with their homework, to make sure that they are engaged in their classes and are falling behind their classmates. Building stronger students means strengthening our schools and our country, one hungry mind at a time.

Buy American - Whenever possible, buy products that come from factories right here in America that employ our fellow citizens, or food produced on American farms. It might require you to take an extra second to check the tag on the t-shirt before you buy it, or to research which grocery stores stock corn and beef raised by the US agricultural industry, but doing so will keep American businesses open.

Spend responsibly - If you can, pay down your credit card debt. Buy things you need, rather than splurging on unnecessary items. The public isn’t served by segments of our population defaulting on mortgage payments or credit card debt, or declaring bankruptcy. So spend within your limits, and if you haven’t already, open a savings account to foster financial security in the future.

Support public services - Is there a bond initiative on your ballot for a local library? Or is a library committee hosting a fundraiser? Pitch in! Keeping valuable services like libraries available to the public means that people who can’t afford to purchase books or computers can have access to them nonetheless.

Give the gift of your expertise - If you’ve got a special talent or professional training, put your gifts to their best use by donating your time to those in need. Are you a lawyer or a paralegal? In your spare time, connect with your local Legal Aid office to give pro bono legal services to those who otherwise couldn’t afford an attorney. Doctor, dentist, or nurse? Spend a few days at the local free clinic. If you’re an accountant, help someone less fortunate prepare their taxes. If you’re a construction worker, swing a hammer for Habitat for Humanity. Maybe you’re a student…tutor underprivileged children, or coach an after-school sports team. No matter what you do, chances are someone could really use your help.

 

Guest-tjefferson85

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« Reply #1: Jan 21, 2009, 2:16 PM »
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and proudly execute whatever he should deem fit!
Guest-lgmcp

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« Reply #2: Jan 21, 2009, 3:18 PM »
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in my state. I had other ideas, involving tutoring and such, until Prop 8 failed in California. Now I realize: if I am not for myself, who will be?
Guest-jen

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« Reply #3: Jan 21, 2009, 3:38 PM »
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Thanks for keeping us safe and God Bless!
Guest-JenniferInMO

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« Reply #4: Jan 21, 2009, 6:37 PM »
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You have my deepest respect and gratitude!
Guest-altruista

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« Reply #5: Jan 21, 2009, 6:38 PM »
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I don't qualify for unemployment compensation because I've been self-employed for years, and I'm recently emerging from a prolonged medical situation that resulted in, you guessed it, financial ruin. I want to work for justice, but right now I'm technically homeless myself. This is with a degree with honors from a university with a very rigorous curriculum. I have talents I can contribute, and I want to badly, but I need to be able to pay the bills myself. I've offered to work for nonprofits if someone---a benefactor, the nonprofits, anyone---will pay me a salary, even if it's only for 15 or 20 hours of work a week. It's like yelling into an echo chamber. I don't want a handout. I want to give back. I've already been working pro bono for a nonprofit for three years for a few hours a week. I can't afford to work for free any more than that. So my long answer to your poll is a dash of exasperation.
Guest-tjefferson85

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« Reply #6: Jan 21, 2009, 6:47 PM »
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We appreciate it!
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